Sarah Anderson

Sarah Anderson

Global Head of Marketing and Partnerships
Amazon Games

Roundtable Leader

Website: https://www.amazongames.com/en-us

Publishing a Modern Game Globally in 2023 and Beyond

As games have become more complex to build, so too has the act of publishing these games to global audiences with different cultural sensitivities, sensibilities, and preferences. Itís not just a simple matter of translation: a global publisher needs to account for live ops on global servers, cultural and regional sensitivity to certain kinds of content, a heightened focus on inclusivity, distinct preferences and aversions to particular monetization models. The list goes on. However, with the considerable investment required to build and sustain a modern, AAA game, these are all critical considerations that todayís best publishers must keep top of mind to ensure their games put their best foot forward and are successful on the broadest possible scale. In this roundtable discussion, led by Sarah Anderson (Amazon Games), industry leaders will walk through all of the considerations they make before publishing their games globally and share their unique insights and learnings along with best practices and emerging trends.

Bio:

Sarah Anderson is a proven, dynamic brand innovator, having spent more than 30 years leading growth initiatives and building brands and communities for major businesses in interactive entertainment and digital streaming. She joined Amazon Games in 2019 as Global Head of Marketing and Partnerships. Prior to Amazon, Sarah served as Chief Marketing Officer at the video streaming service Kanopy. This was preceded by more than 12 years at 2K Games, where she was a founding team member and Senior Vice President of Marketing, building some of video gamesí most successful franchises, including BioShock, Borderlands, Civilization, XCOM, NBA 2K, MLB 2K, NHL 2K and WWE 2K. Sarah is a veteran in the games industry and started her games career at Sega of America, later moving to SegaSoft, where she helped launch Heat.net, which ultimately became the Dreamcast Network.